Starmoots

The conjunction of a wandering nightlantern
with one of the fixed nightlanterns is known as a
starmoot. Each conjunction brings with it divine
messages from the Seven or sometimes from the
Secret Gods. These messages are meant to aid
and guide mortals, though their meanings are
difficult to interpret; every faith (and more than one
temple within each faith) has it’s own approach to
interpreting these omens. Most temples agree on
“standard interpretations” for the most common
starmoots—this conjunction always warns of war,
that one of disease or plague, yon other one of new
prosperity and so on—but only if certain conditions
are met. If not, the starmoot can have any one of
a dozen or more different interpretations. Temple
officials record these conflicting ‘holy meanings’
and the circumstances surrounding the starmoot
into secret books, continually expanding and
clarifying (or muddling) the lore surrounding
certain starmoots. Many notes also record visions
experienced by priests after praying for divine
guidance in regards to a particular starmoot.
There are fourteen more common starmoots
based on the paths the wandering nightlanterns
take, though many other (lesser understood)
starmoots can and do occur, including moots
between fixed nightlanterns and the Ruby Eye of
Amaunt. Priests take careful note of events that
may support or discount specific auguries and
also note the positions of other “wanderers” or
celestial bodies that might affect such meanings.
As a result, each temple’s “secret book of signs” is
ever-expanding and changing, as priests attempt to
cleave ever closer to fully understanding the divine
intent.
It helps matters not that seemingly random
celestial events such as longfires, the seven rarely
seen comets, that occasionally cross the night
sky affect the meaning of starmoots. In general,
longfires herald the coming of good fortune or
wealth and may blunt the ominous tidings of an
inauspicious starmoot.
While some would rather not believe in
such portents, starmoots do affect Castlemourn
as a whole. Thus, when Quemenndur, the Old
Owl, moots with Durblade, the Fallen Warrior,
the undead will rise in greater numbers. When
Ralanduth, the Sundering Sword, moots with
Viliyathar, the Sky Dragon, a time of war and
usurpation is upon us all. The mooting of Vorth
Urla, the Devouring Worm, with the Tree of Stars
heralds the birth of new spellcasters, the discovery
of new sources of magic, and the creation of new
spells. These things happen to believers and nonbelievers
alike; it is simply part of life here in
Castlemourn.

The Lands of Castlemourn

Starmoots

Castlemourn JimWayne